• Kingalfred
    2.1k
    dgzdh2fo8sa71uy0.png
    These things are just , ugg, plague of these would be destructive....
  • Paulgro
    964
    I don't like a normal size hornet and know they are nasty little things. So I wouldn't want to meet one of those in the picture.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k

    Seen a video were two of these decimated a Bee hive?!?
  • Paulgro
    964
    We have enough problems with killer bees, don't need these too.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Church of Scotland sues for share of $2.5 million Viking treasure trove

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    The Church of Scotland is suing a man for a share of a $2.5 million Viking treasure trove he discovered with a metal detector on church land in 2014.

    Retired businessman and detectorist Derek McLennan uncovered the 10th-century hoard in a field in the Dumfries and Galloway region of western Scotland.
    The treasure trove, known as the Galloway Hoard, is regarded as one of the richest and most significant finds of Viking objects ever found in the United Kingdom. It included rare silver bracelets and brooches, a gold ring, a bird-shaped gold pin and an enameled Christian cross.

    "I unearthed the first piece, initially I didn't understand what I had found because I thought it was a silver spoon and then I turned it over and wiped my thumb across it and I saw the Saltire-type of design and knew instantly it was Viking," McLennan told the BBC at the time of the discovery.

    Fiona Hyslop, the Scottish culture secretary, noted that the Galloway Hoard "is one of the most important collections ever discovered in Scotland," and "opens a window on a significant period in the history of Scotland," according to National Museums Scotland.

    Stuart Campbell, head of Scotland's treasure unit, told the Guardian: "What makes this find so significant is the range of material from different countries and cultures. This was material that was buried for safekeeping, almost like a safety deposit box that was never claimed."

    Following the discovery of the treasure, National Museums Scotland raised $2.5 million to acquire the treasures for the Scottish public.

    Laws pertaining to the discovery of treasure differ in Scotland from the rest of the UK; payment is only required to be made to the finder north of the border, yet awards are split between finder and land owner elsewhere in Britain.

    It was nevertheless reported at the time that an agreement had been made to split the proceeds of the hoard between the church and McLennan, which was ultimately never honored.
    Reverend David Bartholomew, who belongs to the Church of Scotland and was present when the hoard was discovered, expressed sadness over the events.

    "Derek was my friend and it is sad that it has come to this," he told the Sunday Post. "It is my understanding there was always an agreement the money would be shared with the Church.

    "I'm surprised Derek would go back on a deal because he had done everything by the book at all times. I don't understand why he would, it is not a thing that can be avoided."

    CNN has reached out to McLennan for comment.

    Church trustees subsequently lodged legal action at the Court of Session in Edinburgh against McLennan, claiming the church is entitled to an equal share of the proceeds.

    "It can be confirmed the general trustees of the Church of Scotland have raised an action against Derek McLennan," a spokesman for the church said, according to the UK's Press Association.

    "As that is now a matter before the court, it would be inappropriate for us to provide any further commentary at this time."

    The Scottish government announced $188,000 of funding in December 2018 in order to launch an exhibition of the hoard at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh. This will be followed by a tour to galleries around Scotland between December 2020 and late 2022.

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  • Kingalfred
    2.1k
    Well, this was found on Church land, so belongs to the Church but the Church agreed we'll go 50 50 with you, if you find anything... So yeah, for me he should'nt be allowed the hoard...all to himself... It maybe viking era but no doubt buried by the Church as they knew it could be pillaged? :...
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k

    At times I'm surprised people even report this thing?
    There are times when your 15minutes of fame cost you?
    I wonder how many are never reported eh?
  • Kingalfred
    2.1k
    ..... Don't suppose it's something easily sold.. Most likely needs authenticating
    When the pillages came through, they'd run off into the woods and bury the village valuables, if the village was slaughtered or taken, no one left to dig it back up...

    It's like Egypt, they dig up a new tomb and are like.,.,. Oh no, it's been grave robbed , i'm like.,.,.well...what are you..... A grave robber by the name archaeologist
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k

    You gotta thing with Gold &Sliver Hoards you
    still have the physical value though and that would
    for gems too I would think it's still a dollar value?
  • Paulgro
    964
    Most end up in a museum.
  • Kingalfred
    2.1k


    Would be a buzz digging up a hoard
    "The curse of oak island"
    Still waiting on those guys to hit that jackpot
  • godseeconomy
    2.3k
    I read the article on the bbc news website. The Church of Scotland has a right to it and Derek shouldn't be so mean and greedy. It's unethetical not to split the share.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k

    I keep reading that they solved 'The Oak Island mystery' but
    when I click on it it's all stuff I already watched?
  • Kingalfred
    2.1k
    Don't know if ive missed a season but last series i watched, it was still to be unearthed.. It was like one step forwards 2 steps back...
  • Paulgro
    964
    I doubt they will find anything worth anything. Seems like they are taking the history channel for a ride.
  • Paulgro
    964
    They should split it so I agree with you.
  • Nat M
    1.9k


    Must have the same season here of Oak Island..............still searching.
  • Kingalfred
    2.1k
    Oak island .... The amount of money they've spent over the seasons, they should just do it right .,. Get in the heavy equipment ..for one last giant excavation
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k

    The Government is what stops that?
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    7ltb8mlihx5eobk9.jpg
    A rare dinosaur fossil found in southern Alberta is being called a "scientific goldmine" by researchers from the University of Alberta and the Royal Ontario Museum.

    A 76-million-year-old, nearly complete dromaeosaurid saurornitholestes langstoni specimen was unearthed in Dinosaur Provincial Park, located about a two-hour drive southeast of Calgary, in 2014 by world-renowned U of A paleontologist Clive Coy.

    Saurornitholestes is a small, feathered carnivorous dinosaur within the dromaeosaurid family (also known as "raptors") that was previously known from fragmentary remains.
    The species has long thought to be so closely related to velociraptor from Mongolia that some researchers even called it velociraptor langstoni.

    For decades, researchers studied fragments and partial skeletons found in Alberta and Montana, but reasonably complete skeletons remained elusive, and virtually nothing was known about the skull.

    The lack of truly diagnostic material was problematic and made it difficult to know how the fossils found in Alberta compared with raptors found elsewhere.
    That changed in 2014, when an almost complete skeleton, including a skull, was collected by Coy less than a kilometre from where the previous benchmark for the species — called a holotype — was found.

    The U of A said the new skeleton is exquisitely preserved, with all the bones — except for the tail — in life position. (No photos of the actual fossil were made available to the media.)

    Coy, along with University of Alberta colleague Philip Currie and David Evans from the Royal Ontario Museum, then made what they said was a "landmark discovery" showing how the fossil differs from a velociraptor.
    The research identified a unique tooth evolved for preening feathers and provided new evidence that the raptor lineage from North America, that includes the saurornitholestes dinosaur found in Alberta, is distinct from an Asian lineage that includes the famous velociraptor.

    The new research - focusing on the skull - shows that the North American form has a shorter and deeper skull than the velociraptor, the University of Alberta said, adding at the front of the skull's mouth, the researchers also discovered a flat tooth with long ridges, which was likely used for preening feathers.

    The same tooth has since been identified in velociraptor and other raptors.

    "Because of their small size and delicate bones, small meat-eating dinosaur skeletons are exceptionally rare in the fossil record," Evans said.

    "The new skeleton is by far the most complete and best-preserved raptor skeleton ever found in North America. It's a scientific goldmine."
    The university said the study also establishes a distinction between raptors in North America and Asia.

    "The new anatomical information we have clearly shows that the North American dromaeosaurids are a separate lineage from the Asian dromaeosaurids, although they do have a common ancestor," Currie said.

    "This changes our understanding of intercontinental movements of these animals and ultimately will help us understand their evolution."

    Currie said paleontology in general is a gigantic puzzle where most of the pieces are missing, and the discovery of this specimen represents the recovery of many pieces of the puzzle.

    "This ranks in the top discoveries of my career. It is pretty amazing."
  • Kingalfred
    2.1k
    Cute little thing ....
  • Paulgro
    964
    The more they dig, the more they find. Most were rich merchants.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    mcsszfqnnkthgo2j.jpeg
    Mexican archeologists have discovered a trove of 15,000-year-old mammoth skeletons, completely changing previous assumptions about how early humans interacted with the giant creature.

    The researchers unearthed two traps that contained at least 14 mammoth skeletons, containing a total of 824 individual bones, in Tultepec, just north of Mexico city.
    The recent discovery “represents a watershed, a touchstone on what we imagined until now was the interaction of hunter-gatherer bands with these enormous herbivores,” Pedro Francisco Sánchez Nava of the National Institute of Anthropology and History said Wednesday.
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    Archeologists spent 10 months excavating the sites, which are 1.7 metres deep and 25 metres in diameter.

    The circumstances of the traps led the institute to theorize that groups of 20 to 30 hunters would work together, using branches and torches to separate a mammoth from its herd. Once the animal was separated, they would coax it into the human-built traps, kill it and then use it for food and other purposes.

    It was previously thought that early humans could only kill mammoths that had been trapped or hurt.
    nxs07h93rh7bwxb8.jpg
    However, the findings indicate that humans not only ate the meat of the animal, but its organs too. The humans even ate the tongue — which could weight up to 12 kilograms — which is why skulls were often found upside down, according to the press release.

    Not only were the animals eaten, but they were honoured after the hunts.
    Bones of a particular mammoth were splayed in a thoughtful layout, and scientists noticed a bone had regenerated fractures. This indicates “that hunter-gatherers watched him and tried to hunt him for years, that’s why they had to consider him brave, fierce, and showed him his respect,” archeologist Luis Córdoba said.

    It is believed there are more mammoth traps nearby because workers who built the capital’s metro system in the 1970s found bones at Talismán station, CNN reported.

    Columbian mammoths are known to have roamed what is now the United States and northern Mexico, where Tultepec is located.
    Columbian mammoths differ from the more well-known wooly mammoth, in that Columbians resemble modern day elephants more closely. Columbian mammoths did not have fur, like its descendent today, but had immensely long tusks — the largest tusk ever found was 16 feet long — that curved upwards.

    As well, Columbian mammoths stood 13 feet tall, compared to the wooly mammoth and African elephant, which both range from nine to 11 feet.

    Columbian mammoths went extinct between 13,000 and 10,000 years ago, the National Park Service states.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    xt3v2vhfs8pg4kyl.jpg
    Divers exploring the Xoc cenote in central Mexico discovered 13 teeth belonging to three different shark species, including the megalodon, which became extinct over 3.6 million years ago.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Possible Bones of Amelia Earhart
    d9kwm0rmh3fztc75.jpg
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  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Ten forbidden places in the world.

    Attachment
    VIDEO-2019-10-17-19-19-10 (9M)
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Yeah I know it ,
    watched an TV Adventure series about a Bunch of Guys looking for Treasure on it?
    Supposedly was hide there because of the imminent treat there?
  • Nat M
    1.9k


    60 minutes aired that last Sunday on TV ( watched it) and then saw it was the first place on your post.........
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    zm7lfh6pt52lvjmg.jpeg
    Between 2015 and 2019, researchers discovered 31 new carbon minerals, most of them vividly colorful. Edscottite is one of the least flashy new finds, but it's also the one that's set geologists abuzz.

    Edscottite is one of the phrases iron goes through when it's cooling down from a high temperature, as it's smelted into steel. But the edscottite discovered in a tiny meteorite and officially named this year is the first to occur in nature.

    The Wedderburn meteorite's been sitting in Museums Victoria in Australia since it was found nearby in 1951, and researchers have sliced it open to search its contents just as long.

    "We have discovered 500,000 to 600,000 minerals in the lab, but fewer than 6,000 that nature's done itself," Stuart Mills, Museums Victoria's senior curator of geosciences, told Melbourne newspaper The Age.

    It's named for Ed R.D. Scott, a cosmochemist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and pioneering meteorite researcher. He first identified the unique iron carbide in 1971 while studying the meteorite, but technology hadn't advanced far enough for him to characterize its structure.

    It might've formed in space

    Researchers Chi Ma of Caltech and Alan Rubin at UCLA examined a slab of the meteorite and were surprised to find edscottite under an electron microscope.

    Just how it formed is still unclear. Geoffrey Bonning, a planetary scientist at the Australian National University who was not involved with the study, speculated to The Age that it was blasted out of the core of another planet.

    The hypothetical planet, he said, formed when asteroids clumped into one big planet. The planet heated up during its formation, and hot metal dripped into its core.

    "This meteorite had an abundance of carbon in it. And as it slowly cooled down, the iron and carbon came together and formed this mineral," Mills said.

    Eventually, the planet might've been struck by another astronomical body and destroyed, flinging the debris across the solar system.

    The debris, Bonning posited, became the Wedderburn meteorite. The edscottite might've been created when all that metal heated up in the former planet.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Archaeologists in Israel uncover 1,200-year-old 'piggy bank' of gold coins.

    3utnyer1juqbx5bg.jpg
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    The value as Collectors items must far exceed the god value!
  • godseeconomy
    2.3k
    For Sure. Such finds are the nation's property now.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    So if you found something like this would you speak-up?
  • godseeconomy
    2.3k
    Yes, my conscience won't allow me to keep them without checking with authorities.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Australian bushfires reveal ancient aquatic system older than the pyramids

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    Extensive water channels built by indigenous Australians thousands of years ago to trap and harvest eels for food have been revealed after wildfires burned away thick vegetation in the state of Victoria.

    The Budj Bim Cultural Landscape, consisting of channels, weirs and dams built from volcanic rocks, is one of the world's most extensive and oldest aquaculture systems, according to UNESCO. Constructed by the Gunditjmara people more than 6,600 years ago, it is older than Egypt's pyramids.

    While the aquatic system was known to archaeologists -- it was added to UNESCO's World Heritage List last July -- additional sections were revealed by the fires that have ripped through the state in December.

    Gunditjmara representative Denis Rose, project manager at non-profit group Gunditj Mirring Traditional Owners Aboriginal Corporation, told CNN that the system was significantly bigger than what was previously recorded.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
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    In the rural wilds of Ontario, Canada, an incredible discovery was made when a photographer ventured inside an old abandoned house. What looked like a dilapidated home, packed to the rafters with discarded family possessions, turned out to be so much more than it seemed when thousands of dollars were uncovered among a lifetime of historic mementos.
    Having uncovered the significant sum, Dave made contact with the grown-up daughter of the family, who was now the owner of the home, along with her brothers. Now married and living in northern Canada, he reunited the money with its original owners. Today, the house is still standing and the family have begun the large task of clearing out the rundown property.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
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    The signal is a known repeating fast radio burst, FRB 180916.J0158+65. Last year, the CHIME/FRB collaboration detected the sources of eight new repeating fast radio bursts, including this signal. The repeating signal was traced to a massive spiral galaxy around 500 million light-years away.
  • godseeconomy
    2.3k
    We are being spied upon by aliens!!!!!!! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :cool:
  • godseeconomy
    2.3k
    Could be a new style drone rather than UFO ????????
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    A treasure chest hidden in the Rocky Mountains for a decade has finally been found
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    Thousands of brave souls have ventured into the Rocky Mountains for the past decade, searching for a treasure chest filled with gold, rubies, emeralds and diamonds.
    But that adventure has finally come to an end. The treasure has been found.
    Forrest Fenn, the 89-year-old art and antiquities collector who created the treasure hunt, made the announcement Sunday on his website.
    "It was under a canopy of stars in the lush, forested vegetation of the Rocky Mountains and had not moved from the spot where I hid it more than 10 years ago," Fenn wrote in his announcement. "I do not know the person who found it, but the poem in my book led him to the precise spot."

    The treasure was found a few days ago by a man who did not want to be named, Fenn told the Santa Fe New Mexican. He noted, however, that the man was from "back East" and that he confirmed his discovery by sending Fenn a photograph of his newfound riches.
    he treasure, estimated to be worth over $1 million, was a way for Fenn to inspire people to explore nature and give hope to people affected by the Great Recession, he said.
    Clues leading to the treasure's location were included in a 24-line poem published in Fenn's 2010 autobiography "The Thrill of the Chase."

    Fenn estimated that as many as 350,000 people from all over the world went hunting for the treasure, according to the New Mexican. Some quit their jobs to fully dedicate their lives to the hunt and some even died.
    "I congratulate the thousands of people who participated in the search and hope they will continue to be drawn by the promise of other discoveries," Fenn said on his website.
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