• Nat M
    1.8k


    "Some snake species have become threatened due to land clearing for agriculture, urban development and through the introduction of animals such as domestic pets and the cane toad. Maintaining a high level of biodiversity is important to all life on Earth, including humans, and snakes are an important part of that biodiversity. In Australia, we forget that snakes and other reptiles make up a significant proportion of the middle-order predators that keep our natural ecosystems working. Without them the numbers of prey species would increase to unnatural levels and the predators that eat snakes struggle to find food.

    Along with all Australian animals, snakes are protected under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 and cannot be killed or taken from the wild. Snake-keeping in Queensland requires a licence from Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service. Only snakes bred in captivity by a licensed person can be purchased."
  • Nat M
    1.8k
    Prior to the snake video.

    Saturday this little one found a snuggly spot to sleep.

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    Only to taken over by this one

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    Sunday snoozing together

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    Then they woke up and realized that they did not like what they saw :lol:

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  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    it is not that I don't like them I just don't trust them?

    Remember that old fable about the snake and the frog?
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Watch-out for those Flowers.

    Attachment
    What a flower (6M)
  • Nat M
    1.8k


    Orchid mantis - praying matis.
    I have not seen the orchid matis but the Australian praying matis which is green and we have got a brown one
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k

    I had a mantis as a pet for a couple three months when I was a kid!
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    pwuht9jestsivijc.jpg
    A Sparrowhawk's eye colour varies according to its age and gender.
    ⁣Younger birds tend to have green-yellow eyes which turn a brighter yellow
    as they mature, whilst older species can have orange, or even red eyes.⁣
    ⁣⁣
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
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  • Donna
    1.9k
    Lol! We have a mantis right now! My daughter just got brave enough to hold it for the first time today!
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Didn't come through?
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k

    This stunning Purple mantis, Empusa fasciata.

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  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
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    Toxic, aggressive and able to move at lightning speeds, the Black Mamba has a fearsome reputation in sub-Saharan Africa. This is a region where around 1.5 million people suffer a snake bite of one kind or another every year. Been attacked? You’d better hope it was a different species. Most people who encounter a Black Mamba end up six feet under.

    You could run, but the Black Mamba is the fastest land snake on the planet, able to travel at speeds up to 12 miles per hour, making escape on foot unlikely. Been cornered? The end is near, this amongst the most venomous predators around, with death sometimes following a fatal bite in as little as 20 minutes.

    Some 20,000 people die from snake bites in sub-Saharan Africa each year and the Black Mamba is responsible for more than its fair share. Steer clear at all costs or the chances are you’ll pay the ultimate price.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
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    Stepped on a Stonefish? You could be dead inside an hour. Our advice for the unfortunate? Seek urgent help immediately — and start saying your prayers. Most common in coastal Indo-Pacific regions, the Stonefish lurks on the ocean floor, hidden amongst coral and rocks, its remarkable camouflage making it all but invisible.

    Come into contact and you’ll soon know that it’s there, however, the dorsal fin spikes injecting a poisonous blast into misplaced feet. The good news is that an anti-venom is available — but you’ll need to be quick.

    The Reef Stonefish, native to Australia, is considered the most venomous fish on the planet, a sting prompting immense pain that can, in some instances, result in heart failure. Think you’re safe sticking to the sand? Think again. The Stonefish can survive out of the water for up to 24 hours — so even on the beach, dangers endure.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
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    Going to Australia? Make sure to watch out for the most venomous snake on the planet – the ever-dangerous Inland Taipan, a species you’ll certainly want to avoid at all costs. So lethal is this reclusive reptile that experts estimate a single bite contains sufficient venom to kill 100 men.

    For those unfortunate enough to cross paths, death tends to come quickly, in as little as half-an-hour. Been bitten? You’re unlikely to live to tell the tale.

    So far so bad, but the good news is that chance encounters are far from common. Inland Taipan prefer to keep themselves to themselves, making their homes in Australia’s semi-arid central eastern regions, locations that are remote, with humans few and far between.

    Fast and agile, this is a snake that strives to avoid others and will do its utmost to remain hidden in the shadows. But make no mistake: if cornered, the Inland Taipan will defend itself, so walk away if you ever see one.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    q8t31f3fo72tg5p2.jpg
    The Saw-scaled Viper is quite a small snake, but don’t be fooled. This irritable reptile packs quite a punch. Thought to be responsible for more human deaths than all other snake species combined, this is a creature you don’t want to meet.

    The Viper’s venom contains a blend of four deadly toxins and, although death isn’t instantaneous, the devastating effects are soon felt. Those unfortunate enough to be bitten experience uncontrollable bleeding, with the body’s tissues dissolving, limbs being lost and the ultimate price soon being paid. The worst part? There is no antidote.
    Found in the dry regions of Africa, Pakistan, India and the Middle East, the Saw-scaled Viper warns potential victims that it’s about to strike, rubbing sections of its body together to produce a sound that is perhaps best described as ‘sizzling’. Called stridulation, this is your best chance of avoiding an unfortunate end. Happened upon a sizzling snake? Be sure to take heed.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
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    The Blue Ringed Octopus looks like a magical creature – but appearances can be deceptive. Yes, it’s colourful and pretty. But it’s also one of the most venomous marine animals on the planet and a close encounter can have fatal consequences.

    Found in the tide pools and coral reefs of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, this is a common creature from Japan to Australia, and all ports in between. Spotted one lurking in the water? Watch out and keep your distance.

    Dangerous and deadly, the Blue Ringed Octopus’ highly-toxic venom contains tetrodotoxin, and a dose can have dire results for anyone on the receiving end. Nausea, respiratory arrest, heart failure, paralysis and blindness can all be experienced, whilst in severe cases, those bitten can die within minutes. Encountered an Octopus? The creature’s distinctive blue rings will start to change colour if it feels threatened. Seen the warning signs? Take heed and flee.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    cncrhsfjn3w6hp8u.jpg
    Another snake to be wary of, is the tiger snake. If ever there was an animal to be scared of, it’s one with not one, but two scary names. Tigers and snakes are frightening enough, so the thought of a tiger snake is a step too far for many.

    Although this isn’t some kind of weird hybrid of big cat and snake, obviously, but the tiger snake is still extremely dangerous. Native to Southern Australia and Tasmania, this snake kills not just with venom, but a mix of venom, neurotoxins (that affect the brain), coagulants (that make the blood become thick and clumpy) and other types of toxin.

    So although it might not roar like a tiger, it’s certainly not an animal you want to be hanging out with. Accounting for around 17% of deaths by snake bite (actual bites by actual snakes, not the drink ever present in student union bars) in Australia, a bite from a tiger snake will begin as pain and tingling at the site of the bite (usually the foot or lower leg). Then, very quickly, you’ll be sweating profusely, struggling to breathe and then paralysis sets in. You just want to hope there’s someone nearby with the right antivenom.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    evxsbjtcswrbw44m.jpg

    The 23 Most Dangerous Creatures On The Planet
    Advertisement
    Komodo dragon

    Komodo dragon

    If you’re unlucky enough to get shipwrecked, you might feel like your luck had changed if you then happened to be washed up on the shores of a beautiful dessert island. But not so, of you happened to be washed up on the shores of a beautiful dessert island that also happened to be home to a Komodo dragon or two.

    Komodo dragons are both a) usually hungry and b) not fussy. They’ll eat pretty much anything that gets washed up on the shores of the island they inhabit, including relieved shipwrecked humans who incorrectly believe their luck has changed.

    Averaging around 2.5 metres long (compared to the average height of a human being around 1.8 metres) they’re very large creatures. Plus, they can move extremely fast. Not good if you don’t have your wits about you. They also like to hang out in bushes and long grass, stealthily getting ready to pounce on unsuspecting washed up humans or other animals.

    If all that wasn’t bad enough, Komodo dragons have razor sharp teeth and attack by injecting poisonous venom. This will then take about three days to kill you, after septicaemia sets in, causing a slow, painful death, ready for the Komodo dragon’s next meal. So, if you find yourself shipwrecked, try not to get washed up on an Indonesian island.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    j7uzk1458k9veprt.jpg
    The king cobra quite rightly gets its Dangerous and Scary Animal crown, because it’s one of the most venomous snakes here on planet earth, so you really don’t want to bump into one in a dark alley. (Although that’s unlikely, as they live in rainforests mainly, as well as mangrove swamps and bamboo thickets in India, Southeast Asia and Southern China, but you get our point.)

    We’ll get straight down to business ‘ these snakes kill by venom, and in one bite, they can deliver enough venom to kill 20 people. Or one elephant. When threatened, they will ‘stand up’ and could literally look you in the eye, whilst hissing (although it’s said that this sounds more like a growl) and flaring the hood around their heads. Oh, and they can grow up to 18 feet long.

    Don’t be fooled by images of snake charmers seemingly with their king cobras under control in a basket. These snakes have usually had painful torture inflicted on them to make sure they don’t attack their charmers, going against their natural instinct.

    Despite appearances though, king cobras are actually pretty shy animals, and will only attack, or threaten to attack, which is scary enough, when threatened. So it’s definitely best not to threaten this majestic beast!
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    ntj2am6vph24r4ek.jpg
    When we think of bees, we tend to think of cute, furry, buzzy creatures, who are much more loved than their annoying buzzy counterparts, the picnic destroying wasp. But the Africanized bee is a different story, and is even more aggressive than a drowsy wasp at the end of summer.

    Otherwise known as killer bees, the Africanized bee resides in the Americas (despite its name) and actually exists by accident. In the 1950s, scientists in Brazil bred the gentle, high yield honey producing European bee with the lower honey yield African bee in an attempt to improve honey production.

    Unfortunately, the aggressive nature of the African bee won out, and then a year later, some of these hybrid bees escaped from the lab in what must’ve felt like some kind of apocalyptic film event.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    8kl8npcccxd8gqmk.jpg
    Aside from looking majestic and elegant in the water, and then a bit of a mess if they end up on dry land, the box jellyfish has a deadly secret ‘ one sting and you could be in big trouble indeed. So-called due to its box shaped bell, this type of jellyfish has a series of short ‘pedaliums’ and hollow tentacles hanging from each of the four corners of its box, allowing it to move faster than most other species of jellyfish.

    Most commonly found in the tropical regions of the Indo-Pacific Ocean, these jellyfish can also however be found in the waters of many of the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Often touted as ‘the world’s most venomous creature’, the box jellyfish has killed 79 people in Australia alone (since records began), with around 20-40 box jellyfish related deaths each year in the Philippines.

    The box jellyfish kills by venom, which passes through the skin and causes all of the cells of the body to become porous, allowing the delicate balance of fluids with the body to tip dangerously. This causes potassium to leak from the cellular fluid to the blood, causing a condition called hyperleukaemia which then causes the cardiovascular system to collapse and can lead to death within just two to five minutes.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    nyrljx5i6umsipu6.jpg
    Probably the most well-known, and most feared, of all the spider species, is the black widow spider. Found in temperate regions around the world, this spider is recognised by its red hourglass markings on its round, shiny black abdomen.

    As is common in the natural world, the female of the species is more deadly than the male (as the song goes). These spiders have nasty venom, and if bitten, you can expect to experience nausea, muscle aches, weakness, chills, a fever and most terrifyingly, a paralysis of the diaphragm, making breathing very difficult indeed.

    They don’t often bite humans unless provoked. But provoking can mean innocently putting on your shoe, that happens to have been board and lodgings for a black widow spider overnight. Or hauling old furniture you have stored in a garage and upsetting a black widow spider nest. So beware!

    Surprisingly, despite accounts to the contrary, a bite from a black widow spider is unlikely to kill you, unless you’re very young, very old or very ill. However, it is true that the female black widow spider does, on accession, kill and eat her male mate after mating with him.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    ay5lzkb1fjj5sdoe.jpg
    As expected on this list of the world’s most dangerous animals, there’s one or two snakes here and the faint-banded sea snake is no exception. But we must point out, this snake is actually owed an apology.

    In 1996, two authors, Ernst and Zug, published book called Snakes in Question: The Smithsonian Answer Book. In this book, the faint-banded sea snake was mistakenly categorised along with the hook nosed sea snake, a different species. Since then, the faint-banded sea snake has been presumed to be the most venomous snake in the word, when in fact, this isn’t true.

    However, you still don’t want to find yourself alone with a faint-banded sea snake when they might be in a bad mood, because they’re still extremely venomous. Since they’re a water dwelling snake, the only reported victims have been Vietnamese fishermen. But if you’re in Vietnam and fancy a spot of fishing, keep this in mind!
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    2cdm5ccvhd3ga8g7.jpg
    If you find wasps annoying, and you question the point of them, then you’re amongst friends. Wasps are annoying, frustrating and love to ruin an afternoon in a beer garden. But come across a German yellow jacket wasp and you’ll be wishing for the bog standard picnic bench dwelling wasp to return, all previous misdemeanours forgiven.

    German yellow jacket wasps are bigger, more aggressive and more likely to sting than our usual wasps. In fact, they like to sting, repeatedly, for no apparent reason other than they want to spoil your day. Especially so in the late Summer, when they’ve become even more boisterous after feasting on rotting, fermenting fruits, causing them to become drunk.

    Found pretty much everywhere aside from Antarctica, these wasps inject venom that can leave a nasty reaction, especially if you’re stung multiple times. If you happen to get close, you’ll distinguish this bigger wasp by the three black spots on its face.

    Oh, and try to refrain from waving your arms around to bat a German yellow jacket wasp away ‘ it’ll make them think they’re under attack and will sting at will even more freely, calling their mates over in the process.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    Day Care for Tigers (7M)
  • Nat M
    1.8k


    I have been bitten by a Redback spider (Black widow). I eventually got myself to the hospital once i started to feel the venom go up my arm.
    I had things to do, pick up my son from after school sports. On the way back home i told him i think i better go to the hospital.
    They did nothing. Monitored me for 4 hours and let me go home.
    It was in the rim of a pot plant and i saw it
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    You have to be careful,empty you shoe and such just in case, I was watching a Nature show and a woman was telling her story about being bitten & she survived like you but had a vendetta against them and used hunt them around her hose with a flip-flop.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    I didn't think that colour was in an animal in nature?
    Indian Giant Purple Squirrel Native to Karnataka, India

    2oslu7mdogn0boc6.jpg
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    At first Glance....(lol)


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  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
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  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Holy Crap

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  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
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  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    This was so good,reminded me of a Disney movie.

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  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    VIDEO-2020-08-09-06-50-40 (7M)
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    THE WINEMAKERS CAT (7M)
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