• Paulgro
    964
    Rare 3.8-million-year-old skull reveals the face of Lucy’s ancestor, gives insight into early man
    Doyle Rice, USA TODAY Published 4:06 p.m. ET Aug. 28, 2019 | Updated 4:07 p.m. ET Aug. 28, 2019
    6756e473-5a89-4d7b-9b1f-74f3854d65fa-ClippedFront.jpg?width=540&height=&fit=bounds&auto=webp

    The 3.8 million year old skull of a human ancestor was recently discovered in Ethiopia.
    The 3.8 million year old skull of a human ancestor was recently discovered in Ethiopia. (Photo: Dale Omori, Cleveland Museum of Natural History)

    A 3.8 million year old skull from Africa is giving researchers a peek into humanity's evolutionary history, a new study suggests.

    The find shows what the face of a possible ancestor of the species famously represented by Lucy – the well-known Ethiopian skeleton discovered in the mid-1970s – may have looked like.

    The study was published Wednesday in the peer-reviewed British journal Nature.

    The fossil cranium represents a specimen from a time interval between 4.1 and 3.6 million years ago, when early human ancestor fossils are extremely rare, researchers say.

    “The preservation of the specimen really is exceptional,” study co-author Stephanie Melillo, a palaeoanthropologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, told Nature. The skull was found in just two large pieces, which she says is unfathomably unlikely for a specimen of this age. “We just got really lucky with this find.”

    The study was led by Yohannes Haile-Selassie of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

    According to Nature, the scientists who discovered the skull say it was a male and belongs to a species called Australopithecus anamensis.

    A facial reconstruction model by John Gurche made from a fossilized cranium of Australopithecus anamensis. The species is considered to be an ancestor of A. afarensis, represented by “Lucy” found in 1974.
    A facial reconstruction model by John Gurche made from a fossilized cranium of Australopithecus anamensis. The species is considered to be an ancestor of A. afarensis, represented by “Lucy” found in 1974.
    36745598-6244-4afc-aab2-1960cdebb86f-MRD_CMNH0353.jpg?width=180&height=240&fit=bounds&auto=webp
    (Photo: Cleveland Museum of Natural History /MattCrow)

    That ancestral species is the oldest known member of Australopithecus, a grouping of creatures that preceded our own branch of the family tree, called Homo.

    It was also thought to precede Lucy’s species, which is known as Australopithecus afarensis.

    But features of the latest find now suggest that the new fossil's species shared the prehistoric Ethiopian landscape with Lucy’s species, for at least 100,000 years, the study authors say. This hints that the early evolutionary tree was more complicated than scientists had thought, Nature said.

    This overlap challenges the widely-accepted idea of a linear transition between these two early human ancestors. "This is a game changer in our understanding of human evolution during the Pliocene," Haile-Selassie said.

    "What we've known about Australopithecus anamensis so far was limited to isolated jaw fragments and teeth," he said during a press conference. "We didn't have any remains of the face or the cranium except for one small fragment near the ear region."


    The age of the fossil was determined to be 3.8 million years old and was done by dating minerals in layers of volcanic rocks nearby.

    The fossil was found in 2016, in what was once sand deposited in a river delta on the shore of a lake in Woranso-Mille in Ethiopia. "I couldn't believe my eyes when I spotted the rest of the cranium. It was a eureka moment and a dream come true," said Haile-Selassie.

    Experts unconnected to the new study praised the work. Eric Delson of Lehman College in New York called the fossil “beautiful” and said the researchers did an impressive job of reconstructing it digitally to help determine its place in the evolutionary tree.

    Contributing: The Associated Press
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Giraffe-sized flying reptiles once soared over Alberta

    lo57c03ypleveujs.jpg
    A huge, flying reptile that weighed as much as several adult humans combined and had the wingspan of a small plane soared over Alberta during the Age of Dinosaurs — and researchers have now identified it as a new species.

    The species, Cryodrakon boreas, means "frozen dragon of the north wind," said David Hone, lead author of a paper published Tuesday in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

    The species was identified from fossils collected by paleontologists and local residents over several decades in Alberta's Dinosaur Provincial Park.

    Hone, a paleontologist at Queen Mary University of London, himself has looked for pterosaur fossils in the park annually for seven years, but hasn't yet found any. Those trips, did, however, help inspire his name for the new species.
    "It's a beautiful, stark landscape in winter, but dear God it's cold and snowy," Hone told CBC News. "We wanted to try and evoke that."

    The study describes an animal that would have been about as tall as a giraffe, with similarly long legs on a short body, a mass of up to around 250 kilograms and wings that stretched about 10 metres from tip to tip. It's not much smaller than the largest pterosaur ever found, excavated in Germany, which had a wingspan of about 12 metres. That's longer than the 11-metre wingspan of a Cessna Skyhawk
    nnxnbmmtpk25ggdm.jpeg
    "These things have great, big long necks as well," said Hone. He said that in addition to flying, they would have walked and run on all fours, likely with a giraffe-like gait that moves both legs on one side at the same time to avoid tripping.

    The new pterosaur lived about 77 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period, when Dinosaur Provincial Park was the swampy, subtropical home to dinosaurs like Albertasaurus and Chasmosaurus. Cryodrakon probably preyed on lizards, small mammals and perhaps even baby dinosaurs..

    The new species belongs to a group of huge pterosaurs called Azhdarchids that had large legs and feet, and lived inland.

    The most well-known among them is Quetzalcoatlus, first named from fossils in Texas in the 1970s. The problem, Hone said, was that for a long time it was never properly described, making it impossible for others to confirm whether other fossils were the same or different.

    Now, with access to many Quetzalcoatlus and other pterosaur fossils from around the world, he and paleontologists at the University of Southern California and the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta were able to carefully compare fossils from about a dozen individuals collected at the museum. They ranged from a baby with a wingspan of just 1.5 metres to an adult with a wingspan of more than 10 metres.
    Stories behind the bones

    The oldest among them was a toe bone collected by a woman referred to as Mrs. Olafus Johnson of Ralston., Alta., in Dinosaur National Park and described by Dale Russell of the National Museum of Natural Sciences in Ottawa in 1972.
    But the most scientifically valuable were the neck, leg, shoulder and wing bones of a single young pterosaur found by legendary dinosaur hunter Wendy Sloboda in 1992. It had been eaten by a velociraptor-like carnivorous dinosaur that had left tooth marks and even got one of its teeth stuck in one of the bones. The researchers who described it, though, suspected it was scavenged rather than hunted, as the pterosaur already had a wingspan of about five metres, and the meat eater was likely less than two metres long.

    By examining those fossils, the researchers noted some unique features compared to other pterosaurs, including a different number of holes in their back bones, which were hollow like bird bones to make them lighter for flight.

    In addition, Cryodrakon's neck, though still enormously long, is "a little bit shorter and fatter" than Quetzalcoatlus's, Hone said.

    Cryodrakon may not have been the only species of pterosaur in Canada.

    Two pterosaur fossil discoveries were previously reported on Hornby Island, B.C. One of them was originally named as a new pterosaur species based on part of a jaw, but later identified as belonging to a fish, not a reptile. The other, an arm bone found in 2008, was confirmed as a pterosaur in 2016, but the cat-sized creature hasn't been formally identified as a species.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k


    For those who thought Pumpkin Spice Spam was weird?!?

    u9m9rw32fucdzfwo.jpg
  • Donna
    1.9k
    Ugh! Yuck! This sounds like a crazy pregnancy craving!
  • Paulgro
    964
    No thanks.
  • Kingalfred
    2.1k
    Maybe one or the other...
    Combined....ugh
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Banksy's chimpanzee parliament goes under the hammer Expected to hit $3Million

    h4idb9wafldidtu3.jpg

    I saw a video of an Auction of one of his
    pieces that when sold it Shredded itself?
  • Donna
    1.9k
    Bump
  • Kingalfred
    2.1k
    That's weird though elegant .. Turtle flippers ..its head looked like a wet mammal, with fur , otterish, mink .. Needs more investigation
  • Donna
    1.9k
    Reminds me a little bit of this drawing my daughter did last year. She drew it with a tutorial from YouTube.
    8tqistuvqha904nw.jpeg
  • Paulgro
    964
    She does good work.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Father and son film 'Ogopogo' in Canadian lake



    The video, which was originally recorded on July 10th, 2018, was uploaded onto YouTube this week by Blake Neudorf who had been fishing with his father in Okanagan Lake - a body of water famous for its Ogopogo lake monster - at the time of the sighting.

    "The thing looks like it is close in the video but it was a few hundred yards off shore and it was huge, I would say at least 60 feet long you could visually see it rolling in the water," he wrote.

    "During this video there was a small group of people videoing off-shore as well."
    "Toward the end it goes into a small bay so me and my dad hopped in the truck and drove toward the area it was headed but when we got to the bay it was nowhere to be seen."

    Ogopogo is typically described as a large serpent-like creature that has been sighted at the lake as far back as the 19th Century, although there remains no conclusive evidence of its existence.

    Could this be what Blake and his dad filmed that day or is there a more conventional explanation ?
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    'Bigfoot' shows up on Sherman Pass webcam

    l51931xjvonnvksv.jpeg
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    VIDEO-2019-11-29-09-30-12 (8M)
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    20goodnewsstories1 (8M)
  • sharonh
    407
    loved the pronunciation of "motorcycle"
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Interesting Fact about the Japanese

    Attachment
    VIDEO-2019-12-23-15-42-33 (6M)
  • godseeconomy
    2.3k
    No way!! Have a cup of fish tea?????
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    it's not real just decorative,like lots of fun Japanese stuff,you should see their fun bread!
    7a55h79yner8klka.jpg
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    VIDEO-2019-12-23-15-42-33 (6M)
  • godseeconomy
    2.3k
    Certainly very artistic production. Just imagine the amount of time and energy in moulding these sorts of edibles. Wouldn't want to eat them, too beautiful to destroy the artwork!! Wonder if they are as tasty as they look?
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    Made from Paper.. 1 (6M)
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    Wood_sculptures1 (3M)
  • Donna
    1.9k
    The paper and wood posts are really cool!
  • godseeconomy
    2.3k
    Some very clever and creative artists. It's a joy yo watch. Thanks, Bob.
  • Paulgro
    964
    An Egyptian Mystery Takes New Turn


    NEWS 2 Days Ago Newser — John Johnson
    Scientists in Egypt are bound and determined to find the long-lost Queen Nefertiti. Now, a new team is floating the possibility that she is buried in a secret chamber within King Tut's tomb, reports Nature.

    Sound familiar? That's because the intriguing possibility was first raised in 2015, only to be seemingly put to rest by a thorough radar scan in 2018.

    The new twist comes from a team led by former Egyptian minister of antiquities, Mamdouh Eldmaty. Using ground-penetrating radar of their own, he and his researchers scanned the area around Tut's burial spot and detected what they say is a previously unknown chamber, which Business Insider describes as 7 feet high and 33 feet long.

    Their report has not been formally published, but Nature obtained details that were sent to Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities.

    So what now? The council will presumably decide whether to move forward with a more thorough investigation.

    "Clearly there is something on the other side of the north wall of the burial chamber," Egyptologist Ray Johnson of the University of Chicago tells Nature.

    Johnson, who was not involved with the new study, called the results "tremendously exciting." The story, though, is also tempered with a not-so-fast sentiment from skeptics.

    Nefertiti, whose daughter married Tut, was an Egyptian queen, though some historians think she also ruled as a pharaoh herself for a spell before her death.

    Artnet News, perhaps excited by the idea of what the burial place may hold, is highlighting this quote: “If Nefertiti was buried as a pharaoh, it could be the biggest archaeological discovery ever,” says British archaeologist Nicholas Reeves, whose team was behind the 2015 study.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Attachment
    pyramids VID-20200124-WA0000 (11M)
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Who would've thought it would really all come True way back then?
    But we still don't have that Flying Car...Yet?


    Attachment
    VIDEO-2020-06-25-11-27-15 (16M)
  • MarkUltra
    0
    Wow, everything looks so amazing. You know, I saw a lot of such compilations on Tik Tok about strange and rare things. Authors of these videos usually so popular and has a lot of followers. But with the help of hypetik.com you can get a lot of fans. It is so easy, check it.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    No way you'd wanna be driving in that mess?

    Attachment
    VIO Autoroad traffic world2 (10M)
  • J Zerbs
    679
    If really from 56 kinda crazy how much they got right but would be shocked if it actually was. Seems like it was put together this year but was done pretty well though.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    z862qk3x9w5rqoes.jpg

    Last week we reported that a helicopter pilot who had been helping wildlife resource officers count bighorn sheep in Utah had discovered a real-life version of the mysterious monolith featured in Arthur C. Clarke's science-fiction masterpiece '2001: A Space Odyssey'.

    Crafted from solid metal, the artefact, which was situated in a remote rocky outcropping, appeared to have been planted in the ground deliberately, perhaps as some sort of modern art piece.

    Since them, officials have revealed that the artefact has in fact completely disappeared after being removed from the site by 'an unknown party'.

    "We have received credible reports that the illegally installed structure, referred to as the 'monolith' has been removed from Bureau of Land Management public lands by an unknown party," they wrote.
    "The BLM did not remove the structure which is considered private property. We do not investigate crimes involving private property which are handled by the local sheriff's office."

    "The structure has received international and national attention and we received reports that a person or group removed it on the evening of Nov. 27."

    Some visitors to the site have since claimed that the object was actually stolen and that they had seen a pickup truck carrying something away from the scene, however this has yet to be confirmed.

    As for who put it there in the first place - nobody seems to know.
  • Bob Dack
    2.7k
    Here's me wonder if all these copycat are communicating with each other?

    rutlqqi4ca81nmou.jpg
  • Nat M
    1.9k
    BUMP
  • Nat M
    1.9k
    BUMP
bold
italic
underline
strike
code
quote
ulist
image
url
mention
reveal
youtube
tweet
Add a Comment

Welcome to Univox Community!

Hello Members!
Welcome to Univox Community Forum. This forum has been created so that you can exchange ideas, converse and interact with Univox Community. Please keep your posts relevant to the forum category. Please do not use the forum for promotion or advertising. Irrelevant messages will be deleted straight away. Feel free to share your feedback.