• Bob Dack
    1.7k
    IRS or Revenue Canada Impersonation Telephone Scam

    IRS & Revenue Canada scam: Callers pretend to be IRS or Revenue Canada fraud division employees and tell victims they owe tax monies that must be paid immediately to avoid criminal penalties.[/b]

    An aggressive and sophisticated phone scam targeting taxpayers, including recent immigrants, has been making the rounds throughout the country. Callers claim to be employees of the Revenue Canada or IRS, but are not. These con artists can sound convincing when they call. They use fake names and bogus IRS identification badge numbers. They may know a lot about their targets, and they usually alter the caller ID to make it look like the IRS or Revenue Canada is calling.

    Victims are told they owe money to the IRS or Revenue Canada and it must be paid promptly through a pre-loaded debit card or wire transfer. If the victim refuses to cooperate, they are then threatened with arrest, deportation or suspension of a business or driver’s license. In many cases, the caller becomes hostile and insulting. Or, victims may be told they have a refund due to try to trick them into sharing private information.

    If the phone isn't answered, the scammers often leave an "urgent" callback request.

    Note that the IRS & Revenue Canada will never:

    "1) call to demand immediate payment, nor will the agency call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill;

    2) demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe;

    3) require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card;

    4) ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone;

    5) threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying."
  • charsocal
    378
    - My mother ( age 75 ) keeps getting these calls and she justs laughs at them and hangs up. She's reported the calls but the calls havn't stopped. Next time she said she was going to ask them for their number and will call them right back. What good it would do?, Nothing! But she has a great sence of humor and the calls don't bother her at all. I feel so sorry for the ones who actually fall for the scam. The IRS will NEVER call you.
  • Bob Dack
    1.7k
    Yeah, they reported about this on a Radio station telling people to warn their old folks but this was the first I have had!!!
  • charsocal
    378
    - This scam has been going on for years. I'm not sure where you are from, but here in the US they report this scam on a regular basis on the local, national and talk show news, but sadly some do not watch the news or listen to the radio. Ahhh, I think you must be from Canada now, duhhhhhhh on my part,lol.
  • Donna
    1.7k
    Your mom reminds me of my mom! I'm thankful that I don't have to worry about her falling for something like this. She often gets calls from people claiming to be Publishers Clearing House telling her that she just won X amount of money, and all she needs to do is send them X amount to claim her winnings. She always keeps them on the phone for a while, wasting their time as they are wasting hers. Then she will tell them, "Well, if I just won all that money, take the amount that I owe you out of my winnings, and then send me the rest." When they reply that they can't do that, she tells them to go get a real job and hangs up on them.
  • Paulgro
    910
    Seems it's going around since I got one today.
  • Christina
    26
    I receive 5 of those calls last week. If I didn't pay now I could go to jail. I just laughed and hung-up.
  • Krystyna
    1.4k
    Good one,thank you for sharing.
  • charsocal
    378
    - That's funny. Yea, my mother actually gets a kick out of these scammers too. I myself get the ones in my email wanting me to confirm my bank account details, so on and so forth, so they can deposit thousands of dollars into my bank account. So one time I emailed them back and told them my bank was The Bank Of A No Fool, the city was Mars, the state was Uranius, zip code 00000 and bank account number 0123456789. They actually emailed me back and stated they could not find the information in their systems. I just laughed and now I just block them all.
  • Krystyna
    1.4k
    The IRS (phone) phony scam is going on for years here in the States, I guess now they are going global .I'm not sure about this picture you posted here;it may offend plenty of people of certain nationality that are members of this site,please reconsider it.....
  • Paulgro
    910
    Just got another one today. We traced the number and it seems to come from Manhattan, NY.
  • godseeconomy
    1.8k
    it's terrible all these scams happening around the world supposedly from gov't depts. we should get back to paper post re these rather than online to beat the criminals?
  • charsocal
    378
    - So true. If it is legit ( IRS ) you will get it in paper form delivered to your home address, then of course take it to the IRS without calling on your phone to double check if it is indeed legit.
  • charsocal
    378
    - Yea, I thought the same thing when I saw the photo. I'm sure Bob wasn't trying to offend anyone, but it possibly could.
  • Krystyna
    1.4k
    I'm sure he didn't have bad intentions but it may offend some.
  • charsocal
    378
    - Oh I know. I'm glad you addressed the matter. I hope Bob dosn't think we are mad or upset at him, just concerned for others feelings.
  • charsocal
    378
    - I would just start laughing at them and hang up. Block their number if you can.
  • Paulgro
    910
    We screen calls with an answering machine. If the fool wants to talk to a machine that's his problem. We do laugh about it.
  • Bob Dack
    1.7k
    Hey Krystyna:- the photo in question was not meant in anyway to offend the general populace,it was only an impression of several conversations that I and I guess several others I seem to have talked to about the whole situation that is going on,as an example there was one person aunt who was gulable enough to be taken for $6000.oo which may not seem like much but to an old timer on a pension that's alot. The Police dectective that have asked about the phone call always get the same answer as the person was very knowledgeable but spoke with an accent maybe Indian or Pakistani or so,that is how the photo and saying came into being and was not meant to offend any one imparticular and I am sorry if any one person or peoples feel offended but a as a notice to all I will put up this answer to what has been posed to me as I have no way of known how to edit it out or take it down?

    ↪Bob Dack
    The IRS (phone) phony scam is going on for years here in the States, I guess now they are going global .I'm not sure about this picture you posted here;it may offend plenty of people of certain nationality that are members of this site,please reconsider it.....
  • Bob Dack
    1.7k
    Krystyna & any others Sorry?
    They always prey on and get the gullible to pay and what is really sad is that they are never caught or stopped that I have ever heard of?

    I will now thank everyone for your understanding and hope I have explained myself well enough for all to understand my outrage? ,,, SORRY AGAIN!

    Many_Thank_Yous.jpg
  • Cassie Lee
    0
    The Treasury Dept. will never call you for any reason. If in fact you owed them you'd get a letter not a phone call. I use to work for IRS which is under the Treasury Department for don't fall for this BS.
  • J Zerbs
    493
    You think everyone would know better than to fall for scams like this. I guess most people do know better but if they send out thousands of emails or make thousands of calls and get just a few to fall for it it's probably worth it to them, a few thousand U.S. or Canadian dollars goes pretty far in the countries those running the scams seem to be from. Also since those being scammed willingly send the scammers money and the scammers are in a country half way around the world it probably makes if difficult for the authorities to catch them.
  • charsocal
    378
    - I wonder if they prey mostly on people past a certain age and income level.
  • Paulgro
    910
    They try to call seniors in their 70's and 80's because they just pay thinking they owe for some reason but never ask why. In plain they will go for people that really can't afford to be robbed. They are the lowest of the low that make a very good living robbing people.
  • charsocal
    378
    - Yea, that's what I thought as I have never heard of any of my friends or family members that are at or around my age getting those phone calls, just the email scams wanting to deposit money in your bank account. Glad my mother stays up to date on these shameful scams.
  • Paulgro
    910
    If I believed the email scams I could afford to buy a small country and still have money left over. If people didn't believe those scams and send whatever the scammer asked the scams would stop.
  • Krystyna
    1.4k
    About 3-4 years ago I got few phone calls from phony Microsoft tech support claiming that my computer is infected with viruses or malware.They suggested to download their desktop program (bogus) so they can remotely clean the pc and improve security,of course for a fee.The first call I answered and told them that I don't have computer.The other calls I just ignored and they eventually stopped.
  • J Zerbs
    493
    I wonder about some of the surveys here on univox and other sites, I've had ones that would ask for my email address and as soon as I entered it I'd be eliminated. Before I would never get scam emails now I get them all the time, here's one I got today.


    Attn; Beneficiary
    2nd of July, 2016
    Greetings,
    My name is Mrs. Dianna Smith, 72 yrs old widow. I got your contact information from a Christian website. I have decided to donate what I have to you. I was diagnosed with cancer of lungs few years ago, immediately after the death of my husband who has left me everything he worked. I have been inspired by God to donate my inheritance to you for the good work of God and charity purpose, i am doing this because my family are unbelievers and I will not allow them inherit this money for their own selfishness. I have come to find out that wealth acquisition without Jesus Christ is a vanity. My late husband was very wealthy and after his death, I inherited all his business and wealth. Based on the doctors reports that i might not live up to three months. My late husband family intentions is to allow me die in this condition because I do not have a child, this have made me source for a Godly person abroad who will make this claim of $10 Million dollars which is deposited in a security firm. I decided to bequeath the sum of $10,000,000.00 to you. If you are much more interested, Contact Mr. Mathew Phillips with this specified email: +442036950660 Inform him you are the recipient i have bequeathed $10,000,000.00 my personal reference number law/chamber/solicitors/je/ws/ WILL/98390-012. I have also notified him that I am bequeathing that amount to you by my personal decision. I will appreciate your utmost confidentiality in this matter until the task is accomplished as I don't want anything that will jeopardize my last wish.
    Warmest Regards,
    Mrs. Mathew Phillips
    Endeavor to Contact My Lawyer Email:

    Just to see what they say I'm tempted to respond and say I'm not a Christian, I am in fact a devil worshiping bisexual polygamist with 113 wives and 91 husbands.
  • Krystyna
    1.4k
    As I said in one of my comments somewhere,I do too get surveys that ask for personal information,I never provide and just get out of them.I like your "response",good one,lol.
  • J Zerbs
    493
    I stopped doing surveys like that a while ago too, I'd like to respond with something similar to what I said but I'm not because it would probably just lead to them sending me more and more emails.
  • Ashok Bhatia
    36
    9mnozc5b263i90z5.jpg
    grusgo41y1kobarq.jpg



    Phone scam: what to do if you are called
    1. Put the phone down. Get rid of the caller and move on with your life. It is not a legitimate call.
    2. During your conversation, don't provide any personal information. This is a good rule for any unsolicited call. And certainly never hand over your credit card or bank details. Just don't do it.
    3. If you've got this far, we can only reiterate point number 1: get off the phone. But whatever you do don't allow a stranger to guide you to a certain webpage, or instruct you to change a setting on your PC or download software.
    4. If possible get the caller's details. You should certainly report any instance of this scam to Action Fraud.
    5. Finally, change any passwords and usernames that could plausibly have been compromised, and run a scan with up-to-date security software. Then ensure that your firewall and antivirus are up to date and protecting your PC.
    6. Do not share your bank account, Credit or Debit or others numbers.
    This is very good you tell everyone about it. This scam preys on people's insecurity about lack of tech knowledge. It is very easy to be a victim, and the best defence is sharing knowledge. It is much easier to put the phone down if you are forewarned.

    if possible contact
    2gn70c9z2a7t09bt.jpg
  • charsocal
    378
    Giggles and do it!! At the top of the page you will find what I emailed to one of those scams.
  • charsocal
    378
    - That was a bold move on their part,not even knowing if you actually have a computer, but I'm sure there are ways for them to find out.
  • Krystyna
    1.4k
    Yes,never respond to this kind of emails as you don't want to validate if if this is your your email l address or not.....
  • J Zerbs
    493
    I'm wondering if that email was sent to random people or if I was sent it because I answered in a survey that I was Christian, because I didn't visit any Christian sites. I actually am not sure what I'd call myself when it comes to my religious beliefs I just answered Christian because of the available options it was the best fit. I do think most of the Bible's teachings are good but there are parts that condone horrible things, where God does horrible things and stories like Noah's ark that obviously never could of really happened. I do think there is a God or higher power, I just don't think any one religion has it 100% correct.

    Like I mentioned before one time I accidentally spelled my name Jutsin in a survey and started receiving emails addressed to Jutsin. After that as a experiment I spelled my name Ustin in a survey and same thing I started getting emails for ustin.
  • Krystyna
    1.4k
    Those are cold calls,the scammers don't know if someone has pc or not.
  • J Zerbs
    493
    Never received a call like that but I've seen messages like that pop up on some websites before. It'd say pretty much the same thing, that they were with Microsoft and your PC is infected with a virus, spyware or malware and they wanted you to buy their program which would clean the viruses from the PC. Seems like these sites were also doing it cold because I wasn't even on a PC when these messages popped up.
  • Paulgro
    910
    Every now and then that scam goes around. I think all theses scammers wait a while then start doing all the scams over again.
  • Bob Dack
    1.7k
    Sorry but this is a bit of a read!

    This all seems to go hand in hand with than Scam "60minutes" the News TV investigation show ran a a program on that was started and run out of Nigeria as the is no laws to prosecute them there.
    But there are now all sorts of place the Scam is run out of?!

    It is so Famous now it has several names the first was "The Nigerian Scam" but also now goes by "4-1-9" or "Advance Fee Fraud" scheme) is parting yet more of the 'something for nothing' crowd from their money.

    Here's how it works: Letters (or, nowadays, e-mail messages) postmarked from Nigeria (or Sierra Leone, or the Ivory Coast, or almost any other foreign nation) are sent to addresses taken from large mailing lists.
    The letters promise rich rewards for helping officials of that government (or bank, or quasi-government agency or sometimes just members of a particular family) out of an embarrassment or a legal problem. Typically, the pitch includes mention of multi-million dollar sums, with the open promise that you will be permitted to keep a startling percentage of the funds you're going to aid in squirreling away for these disadvantaged foreigners.

    In a nutshell, the con works by blinding the victim with promises of an unimaginable fortune. Once the sucker is sufficiently glittery-eyed over the prospect of becoming fabulously rich, he is squeezed for however much money he has. This he parts with willingly, thinking "What's $5,000 here or $10,000 there when I'm going to end up with $2 million when this is all done?" He fails to realize during the sting that he's never going to get the promised fortune; all of this messing around is designed to part him from his money.

    "We have confirmed losses just in the United States of over $100 million in the last 15 months," said Special Agent James Caldwell, of the Secret Service financial crimes division. "And that's just the ones we know of. We figure a lot of people don't report them."
    The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) said on Thursday that swindlers using Nigerian names had extorted millions of dollars from people in the United States, Asia and Europe under the guise of transferring cash abroad.

    The elaborate fraud involves fake official approval to transfer up to 15 million dollars in excess claims on bogus Nigerian contracts as well as pledges to cut the claims amount for help in the use of offshore bank accounts.

    A CBN statement warned foreign companies and businessmen not to fall for the confidence trick, saying that the bank had been surprised and embarrassed by enquiries relating to the fraud. "The bank has no knowledge or record whatsoever of the purported claims or transfers, or even the related alleged contracts," it said.

    A recent variation of the scam directed primarily at charitable organizations and religious bodies overseas involves bogus inheritance under a will. Again the sole aim is to collect the 'advance fees' already described above. A new strategy that has also been used to defraud the 'victims' is to offer to use chemicals to transform ordinary paper into United States dollar bills, which would be subsequently shared by the parties.
  • Bob Dack
    1.7k
    Always if something sounds too good to be true it usually is
    Always go to this up to date website and check-out anything Scams Urban legends anything!

    http://www.snopes.com/

    logo-snopesnotag-large.png
  • Paulgro
    910
    Nigeria owes me a fortune and still hasn't sent it. They keep sending me email but never the check!!!
  • fireangel
    0
    I have gotten both the IRS scammer and the Microsoft phone call in the last couple of weeks. I will tell you when you inform them that you know they aren't with either group. They will get rude with you and start telling you to all kinds of sexual things to them. I about died laughing at the one from Microsoft. I informed him I couldn't do any of things he was telling me to do because there was 404 error part not found. He hung up on me at that point.
  • charsocal
    378
    On my local news today there was a segment with a lawyer where you could call in and ask him a question. Well the question from a lady was what we are all talking about and he said to write down the number from the scammer and call the FBI and if possible record the conversation from another device, just food for thought.
  • Krystyna
    1.4k
    Same here,never received the "fortune" but at least ,among others, a "real" prince himself sent me some of the emails;how enchanting,LOL.
  • Paulgro
    910
    Problem with that is they use one phone for a day or two and never the same again. They phones are put under an assumed name and then to make sure they move on to a different location. It's really hard to get them because of that. Don't forget, if people didn't fall for that Scam and other ones these guys would be out of business in no time.
  • Donna
    1.7k
    How charming!
  • Paulgro
    910
    So let's see, the IRS has threatened to throw me in jail. My local Sheriffs office has a warrant for my arrest but still hasn't shown up yet so I have to wonder when all those millions that all these people have left me finally shows up, should I get a Lawyer or just leave town?
  • fireangel
    0
    The numbers he called from is posted all over the internet as a known scam phone number I actually checked to see. I thought it was funny. I am not at all offended by his talk my ex use to say much worse to me.
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